Animal Surgery

The healthcare providers at High Desert Veterinary are experienced in many surgical procedures.  In addition to spay and neuter surgeries, we do orthopedic surgeries, mass removals, abdominal surgeries and surgically repairing lacerations and abscesses.  Our doctors also have an exceptional depth of experience in dealing with medical crisis, trauma and critical care situations. Our hospital is well equipped for rapid diagnostics and monitoring, and we can also provide appropriate follow-up care, whether it be medical or surgical.

While under anesthesia for any surgical procedure your pet will be hooked up to a pulse oximeter unit and monitored by a technician, at all times.  Appropriate pain medication will be administered post-op and if needed, prescribed to go home.  One of our technicians will go over care for your pet at home and how to properly medicate.

Post Surgical Home Care Instructions

Special attention to your pet is needed in the first few days after surgery. It is common to observe slight depression in appetite and attitude for 48 to 72 hours. Your pet may sleep more than usual and lick at the incision, causing it to appear slightly red. Any behavior changes which exceed these, or excessive irritation of the surgical site should be reported immediately. Special post-surgical care should include:

1. Confinement to a clean area and restricted activity until the sutures or surgical staples are removed.

2. Do not bathe your pet or allow swimming until sutures or surgical staples are removed.

3. Observe eating, drinking, urinating and defecating behaviors. Report any substantial changes from normal.

4. Check incision daily. Remove any crusted drainage or scabs with hydrogen peroxide or warm water; this should be necessary for only the first few days post-op. If excessive licking occurs, an E collar should be used. A light application of Neosporin can also be used directly over and around the incision. If the problem does not resolve itself within 12 hours, report back to us for further instructions

The poor dog, in life the firmest friend.  The first to welcome, foremost to defend

- Lord Byron